Using VS as a diff viewer

Do you like the new Visual Studio differnce views? I just discovered that you can use it from the command line like so "C:\Program Files (x86)\Microsoft Visual Studio 11.0\Common7\IDE\devenv.com" /diff C:\path\file1.cs C:\otherPath\file1.cs So this means you can use it as your new favourite in Tortoise SVN, where you set it as, "C:\Program Files (x86)\Microsoft Visual Studio 11.0\Common7\IDE\devenv.com" /diff %base %mine    

I've got 99 problems...

I've got 99 problems but a Regex ain't one. Sorry, never found these hard. Although it just took be 5 goes to come up with [0-9]*

WPF: Re-creating VS2012 window glow

WPF is such a powerful technology that I’m reminded of the Perl mantra, there’s more than one way to do it. So rather than just giving you some code, this post is also about explaining why I’ve used several WPF techniques so that you can find some reuse for them too. [More]

Why did I never write this before? Cache<T> as Lazy<T> pretender

Cache is simply a Lazy that expires.
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Bad developers plagiarise, Good developers steal

I've been reading the conversation that Scott Hanselman kicked off about Good developers vs Google developers and I have to say that my own feelings are pretty much summed up by those of Rick Strahl. Except for one point. Like many of these issues there is no black and white, but there is a lot of grey. Rick et al., have pointed out the advantages of using a reference library, such as the meta-library provided to us by the internet, but my point is not only that its desirable, but actually necessary to be a good developer. Without the reference to see many examples, how can one determine what makes code better or us? Without somebody proposing good design, how do we identify bad? In short how so we avoid being an isolationist set of teams, with many local maxims, instead of a cohesive profession where we can all benefit. And with that though in mind I’m really glad I went to tonight's LDNUG.

SVN is just out-dated/Hg to the rescue

How Hg saved me from an SVN problem [More]

Using SpecFlow isn’t necessarily a good practice

There’s been a batch of questions on StackOverflow recently on the SpecFlow questions feed that follow a similar pattern. All these questions have one thing in common, they are definitely not using BDD. [More]

Checking something that shouldn't change, hasn't changed

A useful helper class for making sure something didn't change while you ran your tests [More]

VS2012Update2 designer exceptions with referenced attached properties

After finally refactoring an assembly out so that I can re-use it, I've hit a bug in VS2012 update 2 (See connect). You can roll it back out (See stackoverflow). However what this doesn't tell you is that the removal takes about an hour, and then you have to perform a repair on VS2012. At this point I'm giving up and heading home.

The Deployment maturity model

A long time ago I came across The Personal Threading Maturity Model and I still keep referring back to it as a measure of how much further I have to go. Today however, it struck me that I probably could do with some other yardsticks to show how far off nirvana some of things I'm doing really are. With that in mind I present the Deployment Maturity Model, my take on how things often work, how I can see them working if I really push, and how things work in organisations that get it. [More]